FROGGY MATH PROBLEMS

Try some of the problems.

Hop on these Magic Froggy Squares!


1. Remove the following cards from a deck of cards: 1 (ace), 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9. Place these cards in three rows of three. Move the cards around until the sum of each row and diagonal is the same. If you need a hint, look at the bottom of this page.

2. Now, double each of the squares. Face cards = 10. It's best to let aces equal 1. For example, replace the 1 (ace) with a 2, etc. You can replace the 9 with a face card (value 10) and an 8 (because 9 + 9 = 18). How did the "magic number" (the sum of each row or diagonal) change? Why?

3. Now that you're a pro at this, try the same process with 4 rows of 4. What is the new "magic number?" Double each of the numbers and see if the "magic number" has changed.


Hop some more and do these Froggy Word Problems!

1. Frog Pond has 4 huge lily pads. Each pad holds only 8 frogs comfortably. How many frogs can sit comfortably on the lily pads?

2. 50 frogs now live in Frog Pond. How many more lily pads must we add in order to enable all of the frogs to sit on a lily pad at the same time? We don't want any unhappy frogs at Frog Pond!

3. The population of Frog Pond is constantly changing. The population was 50, but 12 frogs have been eaten by predators (such as snakes) and 42 new frogs have been born. What is the population now?

4. Snakes love to eat the yummy frogs at Frog Pond. There are 3 snakes at Frog Pond right now and they are all hungry. If each snake eats 4 frogs today, how many frogs will be eaten today?

5. Fortunately, the snakes will not be hungry again until next week. Complete the table below as if this weekly feeding pattern will continue for the next six weeks.

Week
1
2
3
4
5
6
Total frogs eaten
12
16


6. The students did a survey of the frogs and discovered that about one-fourth of the frogs have tiny brown spots. If there are 120 total frogs, about how many will NOT have tiny brown spots?


7. One of the students, Juan, did a frog jumping contest with a few of the frogs. The best jumping frog jumped the following distances: 80 cm, 75 cm, 60 cm, 90 cm, 75 cm, and 68 cm. What was this frog's average jumping distance? What was the range of this frog's jumps? What was the mode?

8. Tina grabbed a frog that she though would also be a good jumper. And it was a good jumper. What would be a reasonable estimate of the distance that this frog will jump?

A. 20 cm B. 80 cm C. 400 cm D. 800 cm


9. Juan decided to measure one of the frogs. He couldn't remember the unit of the measure. What unit did he probably use?

A. meters B. centimeters C. kilograms D. liters

10. Juan was very curious. He decided to weigh some of the frogs. What unit of measure should he probably use?

A. meters B. liters C. grams D. tons


Answers:

1. 4 x 8 = 32 frogs
2. 50-32=18, 18 ÷ 4 = 4 with a remainder of 2, so you will need 5 more lily pads
3. 50 + 42 - 12 = 80 frogs
4. 3 x 4 = 12 frogs
5. 12, 16, 20, 24, 28, 32 frogs
6. 120 x 3/4 = 90 frogs
7. 80 + 75 + 60 + 90 + 75 + 68 = 448. 448 ÷ 6 = an average of 73 centimeters, range of 60 cm to 90 cm = 30 cm, mode of 75 cm
8. B, 80 cm
9. B. centimeters
10. C. grams


HINT for the magic square: the sum is 15
One possible arrangement is as follows:

8
1
6
3
5
7
4
9
2

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These pages were developed through TeacherTECH , a teacher-training program sponsored by the Center for Excellence in Education (CEEE) with support from the National Science Foundation through EOT-PAC.

Copyright © Calvin Rains, 2000-2004.
7/7/04

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