Glossary

Animation--Used to move an object (text or graphic) across the screen. To use this feature, select the object, click Slide Show, click Custom Animation and select an animation effect.

Apply to All--Allows you to place a specific transition or color background on every slide in the presentation.

Audience Handouts--One of the products you can generate with PowerPoint. You do this by choosing the File pull down menu, then choosing Print or clicking the Print button. Then you choose Handouts (2,3, or 6 slides per page) from the Print What dialog box.

Click and Drag--Refers to the action of holding down the mouse while simultaneously moving the mouse. Primarily used to highlight text.

Clip Art --A pre drawn and pre-formatted graphic that you can add to a slide. You can access clip art,which is arranged by topic by choosing the menu bar then choosing Insert, Picture, Clip Art.

Crop tool--A tool that allows you to eliminate portions of a scanned image.

Data sheet--The table into which you type your numbers when you are creating a graph.

Download Image to Disk--Transfers or moves an image (like a picture off the Internet) to a disk (floppy, CD, or hard drive).

Files or Folders--Files refer to individual presentations or documents. (Each of your PowerPoint presentations would be examples of files.) Files can be organized using folders. This feature is used to organize your work.

Five Views--These refers to the five PowerPoint views: Slide View, Outline View, Slide Sorter View, Notes Page View and Slide show.

Keyboard Shortcuts--Keyboard commands that save you time by eliminating menus and mouse clicks. An example would be Ctrl + s, which you can use to save your file.

Looping a Slide Show--Designing a slide show to run continuously until it is stopped manually. This is particularly suitable for an event such as Open House.

New Slide--A very important button to the bottom right of the slide work area that lets you create a new slide.

Outline View--The PowerPoint view that allows you to work on your presentation in outline form.

Outline--One of the products you can generate with PowerPoint. You do this by choosing the File pulldown menu, then choosing the Print option or by clicking the Print button. Then you choose Outline from the Print What dialog box.

Save-- Preserving your presentation in a file format on the hard disk or a floppy disk. PowerPoint gives you several options for saving your work--File from the menu bar, then Save (first time Save as) and choosing a location to save your presentation. It is very important to save your presentation every 10 minutes or so, just in case the power goes out or your computer freezes.

Slide Show--The PowerPoint view that plays your finished slide show so you can check the transitions, builds, and timing.

Slide Sorter View--The PowerPoint view that allows you to rearrange slides and add transitions. builds, and timing.

Slide Transition--The way a presentation "cuts" from one slide to the next. You can control transition effects in Slide Sorter View by using the Transition Effects bar directly above the slide work area.

Slide View--The PowerPoint view that allows to create one slide at a time.

Slides--One of the products you can generate with PowerPoint. You can print slides by choosing the File pulldown menu, then choosing the Print button. Then you choose Slides from the Print What dialog box.

Transitions--The way a presentation "cuts" from one slide to the next. You can control transition effects in Slide Sorter View by using the Transitions Effects bar directly above the slide work area.

Web Address--A code (address) that gets you to a specific Web site of your choice. Example: www.funbrain.com. If you have alive Internet connection, PowerPoint will automatically create a link to the address that you enter.

These pages were made through TeacherTECH, the teacher professional development component of GirlTECH, which is sponsored by the Center for Excellence and Equity in Education (CEEE) with support from the National Science Foundation through EOT-PACI and Rice University.

Copyright © July 30, 2004 by Judy Salmon