Web Quests -- Student Style

Web Sites are developed for many reasons.  I have students create an in-depth web site that will be used to 'teach' a specific mathematics objective, while utilizing information on the web to provide data, or resources for a required application that relates to the math objective.  The project is divided into four parts: 

I.  Research,
II.  Development,
III.  Production and
IV.  Perfection.  

Specific due dates will be announced for each section.

The Internet is a valuable tool that can be used for a variety of applications.  Using it to actually teach an objective can be very exciting.  The Internet can reach many people and it is relatively simple to navigate and use for research.  Each of you have had experiences with learning mathematics.  This assignment will allow you to develop a lesson that will interest High School students, provide real world examples of problems, and provide interactivity for students. 

"A WebQuest," according to Bernie Dodge, the originator of the WebQuest concept, "is an inquiry-oriented activity in which most or all of the information used by learners is drawn from the Web. WebQuests are designed to use learners' time well, to focus on using information rather than on looking for it, and to support learners' thinking at the levels of analysis, synthesis, and evaluation."

This assignment must be modeled after a Web Quest.  Specific descriptions are linked below.

 

 

 

 

Student Prerequisite Skills: This web site is developed using Dreamweaver MX. Students should have a basic understanding of this software as well as be familiar with a graphics editor (ie. Photoshop)  

Student Instructions: The Internet is a valuable tool that can be used for a variety of applications.  Using it to actually teach an objective can be very exciting.  The Internet can reach many people and it is relatively simple to navigate and use for research.  Each of you have had experiences with learning mathematics.  This assignment will allow you to develop a lesson that will interest High School students, provide real world examples of problems, and provide interactivity for students.  "A WebQuest," according to Bernie Dodge, the originator of the WebQuest concept, "is an inquiry-oriented activity in which most or all of the information used by learners is drawn from the Web. WebQuests are designed to use learners' time well, to focus on using information rather than on looking for it, and to support learners' thinking at the levels of analysis, synthesis, and evaluation." This assignment must be modeled after a Web Quest.

Phase I -- Research – (6 days)

Day 1 -- Planning Your Topic Students will decide on a partner and beginning developing the topic for the math lesson. Suggestions:

  • Visit Math Web Sites
    • The Math Forum (http://mathforum.org/) -- especially the tools section
    • ENC (http://www.enc.org/)
    • TeacherTECH@ Rice University (http://teachertech.rice.edu/Lessons/)
    • MSTE – (http://www.mste.uiuc.edu/ )--especially the java applets
    • NCTM – (http://www.nctm.org/high/ ) --especially illuminations
  • Review Planning Document – (see attached)
Day 2 -- Students will complete the planning document and turn in. Research lesson plans and web quests.  Review the following sites and develop ideas to create a lesson plan and/or a web quest for the math topic you are researching.

Assignment:   Complete a rough outline for the structure that you would like to develop for your site.  This should be done with paper/pencil and brought to class tomorrow.  Each student is responsible for completing this draft.

Day 3

  • Define WebQuest
  • Create a lesson folder in your folder on the student server
  • Rough Draft of Outline of Your Site is due-- modify
    • using paper/pencil, create hard copies of the files you are going to create for your Math Lesson - Web Site.  The files should include the following information:
      • Introduction -- include file name, title, and content for this page
      • Task
      • Process
      • Evaluation
      • Conclusion
      • Citations
    • Access the following website:   Building Blocks of a WebQuest (http://projects.edtech.sandi.net/staffdev/buildingblocks/p-index.htm)for directions of what to include in the content of your pages.

Assignment:  Complete the paper copies of your files, staple and turn in by the beginning of class ____. (I give students two days to complete this).

Days 4-6

  • Develop content for the Introduction Page of your Math Lesson. 
  • Search for and develop the Process and Task content for your Math Lesson.
    • Task--Introduce the mathematics that your project is teaching.  Mention the actual application that you are addressing.
    • Process--detailed steps that you want the students working through your lesson to use.  You should include resources from the internet for activities, and/or places to collect data.  This is an INTEGRAL part of a Webquest.
  • All filenames and titles must be submitted for each page.  Include the following
    • 'cool' first page:  index.html
    • Introduction
    • Task
    • Process
    • Evaluation
    • Conclusion
    • Citation

Access the following website:  

 

Building Blocks of a WebQuest
(http://projects.edtech.sandi.net/staffdev/buildingblocks/p-index.htm) for directions of what to include in the content of your pages
Browse the 'Online Math Applications'.  (http://library.thinkquest.org/4116/ )
(this page was created by High School Students!)

Assignment:  Complete the paper copies of your files, staple and turn in by the beginning of class on ____.

Phase II of Math Web Site – (3 days)

Day 1    RUBRIC for Math Lesson Web Site (see attached) (http://hs.houstonisd.org/westsidehs/Curriculum/WebMastering/Lesson/mathrubric.htm)
(the rough draft development for this project should be complete!)

  • Create a lastnamefirstinitial lesson folder in your folder on the student server.  Move the dreamweaver folder to your class folder.
  • Create files for each of the web pages that will be in your math lesson web site.  The topics are listed below.
    • cool first page
    • introduction
    • task
    • process
    • evaluation
    • conclusion
    • citation
  • Each page must have a 1x1, centered, 640 pixel table
  • Include a title for each page
  • Create appropriate meta tags for each page.
  • -- In the Help menu, under Using Dreamweaver, (or F1) search for meta tags.  Read and follow the directions to include the following tags
    • Setting Description Properties
    • Setting Keyword Properties
    • Setting Meta Properties
  • File structure will be checked at the end of class.

Day 2-- Good Web Page Design:

Review the lessons from last semester covering design.
Read the following Web Site:  Web Page Design For Designers ( http://www.wpdfd.com/) -- The accumulation of over eight years of articles, reviews and information about the graphic design of Web sites. Assignment: Open Word; (map to G drive!).  Your notes should be written in Word, and saved to your lesson folder.  The file name should be lastnamefirstinitialdesign.doc.  We will discuss design issues tomorrow in class.

  • Review three of the articles:  summarize the points that you learned.  What can you incorporate into your web site?
  • Review two editorials--highlight three things that will help you with your web development.
  • Visit 10 of these links to get ideas for your web site.

Day 3 -- Searching for 'cool' things for your web site. Search for java applets, fonts, buttons, backgrounds, legal graphics, web templates (free), color schemes and other really neat things that you could use for your web site.  Each class will create a 'cool page' of links to sites you have determined useful. Here are some examples from me.  (Do not include these in YOUR sites.... :)

Susan Boone
      Free Clip Art
     http://teachertech.rice.edu/Materials/GT2001/West/clipart.html Clip art and photographs will make any lesson more appealing.  Although every drawing and photo on the web is copyrighted, there are plenty of sites that have free material.  Some of these sites will want you to give them credit to their site. Read their copyright restrictions before downloading material.

Susan Boone
Fun Things to Add to Your Pages
http://teachertech.rice.edu/Materials/TeacherTECH/extras/menu.html Javascript can be thought of as an extension to HTML which allows authors to incorporate some functionality in their web pages. JavaScript is a scripting language which is similar in syntax to Java. The JavaScript code is embedded within the HTML file and is interpreted by the client browser. JavaScript brings interaction to the web pages. Assignment:  email me the following at sboone@houstonisd.org

  • The URL of sites you have determined useful.
  • Include the Title of the site
  • Include a 1-3 sentence explanation of what the site is about
  • For consistency,  use this format:
  • Title of Site
  • URL
  • indent the description

Phase III of project:  Development. -- 6 days (Mid Project grade

Day 1 Review rubric (see attached) and set YOUR expectations for this project.  (5 is the best score)

Each student must have all of the content entered for each of the pages that you are developing.
Create a navigation system to all pages in your site.  All the links must work and none should be text links. Each page must be linked to all of the other pages.  Suggestion:  The buttons should be labeled appropriately for hate content on on the page.
All content of the pages MUST be in a 1 x 1, 640 pixel table. 
Meta tags must be complete...keywords and content
Cite all content and images used from other sources.

Phase IV -- Perfection Phase of Project (5 days)

  • Review Rubric (see attached) to make sure all criteria has been met for project.
  • Make sure Design and Style meet class discussions.
  • Buttons must be used for a Navigation System
  • Develop Content (more than 3- 4 sentences are necessary for full understanding!)
  • Add 'cool stuff'.  http://hs.houstonisd.org/westsidehs/Curriculum/WebMastering/Lesson/email.htm
“last day before due date” -- Perfection Day
  • Review graded rubric and make necessary corrections and/or completions.  Sign up for time slot to present.
  • Prepare note cards for oral presentation.  Presentation will be from teacher laptop, and must be between
    3 -5 minutes.
  • Introduce project and explain general overview
  • Highlight application problem. State how you used the internet to collect data, as an interactivity tool, for research (assigned in your project
  • Point out evaluation procedures Review citation page with special emphasis on images
  • Summarize web site and bring closure to presentation

Peer Evaluations – I have students that sit at ‘odd’ numbered computers show their lesson to 5 – 6 other students. I give them about 4 minutes to explain their site. I then have students move back to their original seats and have students that sit at ‘even’ numbered computers do the same. Students should give input based on the grading rubric.

Oral Presentation of Projects

This page was last modified on August 2, 2005 .
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